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We asked three of our panel members why they have chosen to volunteer as participants in clinical research. Learn more about what motivates members of the British Research Panel.

Coral, 75 years old, Northampton:

Why did you join the British Research Panel?

My motivation is based on my positive experiences with participating in clinical trials. I have been in three trials, and I only have positive things to say about it. Helping to develop new medical treatment is important, so I’m very happy to contribute by being a member. 

Why are research and clinical trials important to you?

If it weren’t for all prior research done 50 years ago, I wouldn’t have survived my disease to this day. I have been lucky to receive some of the best treatment available, to be cared for by some of the best doctors in the world – just by participating in clinical studies , so for that I’m very grateful. Without research and without the medicine of today, many people wouldn’t survive like they do today.

Have you benefited from participating?

First of all, I feel that I am making a change by being part of clinical trials. Secondly, before I enrolled, I couldn’t even empty the dishwasher or go up the stairs, but after participating, I felt immediately better. So it has also been very good for me personally.

Would you recommend others to volunteer for clinical trials?

Absolutely! I would recommend it strongly, although I think it’s a very personal decision. But research is nothing to be scared of. The researchers still call me today and ask how I am doing.

 

Ashley, 45 years old, London:

 Why did you join the British Research Panel?
I think that being a member might help me and others suffering from Multiple Sclerosis. I hope to find out about future trials that might be going on. The British Research Panel is my only opportunity to be updated about relevant clinical trials.

 Why are research and clinical trials important to you?

Clinical trials are important because the more patients participating in studies the more knowledge we will gain as a society about new and better medical treatments. This will, in the end, result in a longer and better life for patients suffering from chronic diseases.

Would you recommend others to volunteer for clinical trials?

Yes, I would recommend other people to take part in studies, because it might be of benefit to themselves. I had a positive experience, so I think other people will too.

 

Jane, 53, London

 Why did you join the British Research Panel?
I signed up as member because they offered me the opportunity to be part of a clinical trial relevant for my diagnosis. I could help my own condition by participating, and the medicine, that was being tested in the clinical trial, had gone through the first phase, which made it seem safe. It’s absolutely important that I feel safe, when participating in a clinical trial and I did feel safe throughout the whole process.

Have you benefited from participating?

Yes, I had a full health checkup every week, which was good for me. And also, I may have helped other patients by taking an active part in developing new and better medical treatment. I would personally like to see improvement for MS patients suffering from the disease.

Would you recommend others to volunteer for clinical trials?
I would. Especially those suffering from the same disease as me, I’d urge them to participate and to become members of the British Research Panel. There’s no cost for members and all travel expenses to clinics and so on are covered. Furthermore, I felt that I was very well informed by the research doctors during the study, so I do recommend it to others.